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Frequently Asked Questions



QuestionFilterAnswerFilter
Endangered FishUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
Why do we bother with trying to save those 4 ugly endangered fish in the Colorado? You can't even eat them! And we're spending millions...why?
Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973 in an effort to reduce the number of species of fish, wildlife and plants that were becoming extinct or threaten with extinction as a result of untempered economic growth and development. Conservation of plants and animals is important and indicative of the health of the natural environment. Absent efforts to conserve these species the Federal government can impose a number of conditions on future growth and development in critical habitat areas, which in turn could greatly limit the economic health of that area. Many species serve important functions such as the canary in a coal mine that warned of bad air conditions.
Interstate & Federal
Instream Flow DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
What is an instream flow?
An instream flow is a new junior water right held exclusively by the Board for the purpose of preserving the natural environment to a reasonable degree. Instream flow water rights are decreed for a specific rate of flow through a specific reach of stream. An instream flow water right has an upper and lower terminus, usually identified as the confluence with another stream, and is administered as any other water right in Colorado according to the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation.
Stream & Lake Protection
Instream Flow Water Right ImpactsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
Can an instream flow water right impact my water right?
 An instream flow is a new junior water right, and as such, cannot affect senior decreed water rights being used for decreed purposes.  Additionally, the statutes provide that an instream flow appropriation shall be subject to the present uses or exchanges of water being made by other water users "pursuant to appropriation or practices in existence on the date of such appropriation." If you decide to sell or change your water right to another location or use, the statutes allow vested water right holders to review the proposed change for potential impacts, and to request terms and conditions in the new decree to prevent injury to their vested water rights. This statutory protection from injury extends to instream flow water rights.
Stream & Lake Protection
Water Acquistion DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
What is a water acquisition?
When the Colorado legislature created the Instream Flow Program in 1973, it authorized the Board to appropriate and acquire water rights to preserve the natural environment of streams and lakes in the state. In 2002, the legislature broadened the CWCB's authority to allow water acquisitions to IMPROVE the natural environment. CWCB staff works with water right owners and conservation groups to acquire existing, decreed water rights on a strictly voluntary basis to achieve these purposes.
The CWCB can acquire water by "purchase, bequest, donation, devise, lease, exchange or any other contractual agreement."
Stream & Lake Protection
Donated or Leased Water RightsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
What happens to my water right if I donate or lease it to the state?
In Colorado, water rights are property rights that are decreed by the Water Court for a specific use. In order to use the water right for a different purpose, the water right needs to be changed by the court. When water rights are donated or leased to CWCB, the terms and conditions of the transfer, as well as any future obligations are outlined in a separate contract called an Acquisition Agreement.

Once the change is approved by the court, the water rights are held by the CWCB, and are monitored and administered according to the terms of the contract and the new court decree. Under certain circumstances, a water user can temporarily loan an agricultural water right to the Board without the need for water court approval (see 37-83-105(2) C.R.S.)
Stream & Lake Protection
Convey Entire Water RightUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
Do I have to convey my entire water right to the state?
The CWCB does not need to hold the title to the entire water right to use it for instream flow purposes. The statutes provide that the Board can acquire "water, water rights or interests in water" to preserve or improve the natural environment. The Board can also lease agricultural water rights on a temporary basis to preserve or improve the natural environment.
Stream & Lake Protection
Statement of Opposition DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
What is a Statement of Opposition?
A Statement of Opposition is a legal pleading filed with the Water Court in a pending water right case. The pleading typically seeks terms and conditions to protect vested water rights. The CWCB files Statements of Opposition to new water right applications which have the potential to injure decreed instream flow or natural lake level water rights. The majority of Statements of Opposition filed by the CWCB are resolved by stipulations which provide full protection for the instream flow or natural lake level water rights.
Stream & Lake Protection
Satellite Stream Gages Monitoring Stream FlowsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Environment
How do CWCB staff use satellite-linked stream gages to monitor stream flows?
The State Engineer's Office (SEO) and United States Geological Survey Water Science Center (USGS) operate a network of over 700 satellite stream gages in Colorado. The CWCB staff works cooperatively with both these agencies to help fund and employ the latest technology to remotely monitor stream flows on a near-real time basis at these gages. Select gages are monitored by CWCB staff via the state's SMS alert system in order to track stream conditions for both low flow and flood flow occurrences. The SMS alert system allows stream flow information transmitted via satellite to be immediately forwarded to staff's e-mail and cell phones. This data is also utilized in the Instream Flow and Flood Decision Support Systems to allow staff to graphically map and track the alerts on a statewide basis.
Stream & Lake Protection
Well PermitsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
General
Is this where I can get a well permit?
No, we do not handle well permits. You can get information and obtain a well permit from the Division of Water Resources.
Administration & Management
Definition of an Acre-footUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
General
What is an acre-foot (AF)? How much water is that really?
An acre-foot of water equals 325,851 gallons. It would fill the Coors Field infield with a foot of water!
Administration & Management
Interstate Compact DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Legal
What is a Compact?
Simply stated, a water compact is a binding legal agreement between two or more states, that defines how water is shared between them. Under the US Constitution, Congress must approve all interstate compacts, and each state legislature also approves them, making compacts both federal and state law, enforceable against all water users in those states. Another way of dividing shared water resources between two or more states is by an Equitable Apportionment Decree. Such a decree is issued by the US Supreme Court when the states for one reason or another have failed to reach the voluntary agreements that result in a compact. Apportionment decrees are binding on the states that appear in the Supreme Court case and all water users within those states and are enforceable as federal law.
Interstate & Federal
Water Leaving the StateUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Legal
Why do we have to send water downstream to California?
Pursuant to the Colorado River Compact of 1922 Colorado is only authorized to use a certain portion of the river flow. We can exceed our entitlement (except under tightly defined provisions), and we cannot withhold water that we cannot currently use. The other compacts with Colorado's neighboring states all have similar restrictions on how much water Colorado users may divert or consume or establish various enforceable stateline delivery obligations as a matter of law.
Interstate & Federal
Colorado's Droughts and Other States who Benefit from Colorado's WaterUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Legal
Considering Colorado's recent drought periods, why don't we make Phoenix stop watering their lawns and golf courses and filling their swimming pools - its such a waste! Ditto Las Vegas.
One state cannot interfere with how another state uses their compact or decree allocated waters. States can complain and even sue if the water being used in another state is more than its legal allocation and injures the ability of other compacting states to fully utilize their compact entitlements. We need to acknowledge that some communities, such as Las Vegas are taking extraordinary measures to conserve and are actually paying their residents $1 a square foot to rip out their lawns and put in xeroscaping!
Interstate & Federal
Buying Land and Water RightsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Legal
I'm buying property in Colorado and there's a stream running through it. Why can't I build a pond and keep all the water running through my land? After all, it's my property!
Colorado law requires that you have a water right to use waters of the state, even those that run through your property. Colorado's water law is based on a system of prior appropriation. This means that a downstream neighbor may have a water right that's older than yours, so you have to let that water flow through your property.
Interstate & Federal
Retaining Water as a Headwaters StateUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
If the rivers all start in Colorado, we should just keep all the water in the state. It's ours, isn't it?
Early settlers in Colorado believed that to be the case. However, several decisions of the US Supreme Court in the early 1900's determined that the law was otherwise. In an arid region where scarce water was being allocated between users within the state by priority of appropriation the federal law of equitable apportionment between states was adopted to prevent any one state from claiming the entire resource for their exclusive use. Colorado now has compacts or apportionment decrees with all neighboring states to share the water that originates here.
Administration & Management
Water Supply Reserve Account DefinedUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is the Water Supply Reserve Account? I have heard about Senate Bill 179, are these related?
Senate Bill 06-179 was passed by the 2006 legislature and this bill created the Water Supply Reserve Account. The Account is administered by the Colorado Water Conservation Board and monies from the Account can be allocated by grant or loan to fund water activities.
Water Supply Planning
Projects Funded by the WSRAUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What types of projects can be funded from the Account?
The Colorado Water Conservation Board and the Interbasin Compact Committee have developed Criteria and Guidelines describing the use of the Account and the process for applying for funds. The legislation and Criteria and Guidelines use the term “water activity” to describe the types of projects and activities that are eligible for funding. Eligible water activities include: water studies and structural water projects (i.e., pipelines, reservoirs, ditches etc.) as well as non-consumptive projects such as environmental and recreation studies or projects. Please see the Criteria and Guidelines for more detailed information.
Water Supply Planning
WSRA Statewide vs. Basin AccountsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is the difference between the Statewide Account and the Basin Accounts?
Both accounts are for water activities in Colorado’s river basins.

The Statewide Account is available to any Basin Roundtable. Applications for monies from this Account will be reviewed by the Colorado Water Conservation Board in March and September of each year. Since any Basin Roundtable can apply for money from the Statewide Account it is generally believed that obtaining money from the Statewide Account will be more competitive. Consequently, the Colorado Water Conservation Board will undertake a more detailed evaluation of applications for funds from this Account as described in the Criteria and Guidelines.
 
The Basin Accounts were developed to ensure that 1 million dollars would be reserved for each basin until January 2010. This money does not automatically disperse to the individual basins. An applicant must still go through the same process as the Statewide Account with the exception that the Colorado Water Conservation Board will utilize fewer criteria when evaluating applications. Applications for monies from the Basin Account will be reviewed by the Colorado Water Conservation Board in January, March, May, July, September, and November. Any monies not utilized by basins by January 2010 will be transferred to the Statewide Account.
Water Supply Planning
How/When to Apply for a WSRA GrantUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How and when do I apply?
The Criteria and Guidelines provide details on how to apply. In general the application process involves two major steps. First, the applicant must have the proposed activity reviewed and approved by the Basin Roundtable in which the activity will occur. Second, a completed application must be submitted to the Colorado Water Conservation Board 60 days prior to their bi-monthly Board Meetings.Each Basin Roundtable has their own timelines and procedures for receiving and reviewing application. For information regarding Roundtable meetings, visit the Interbasin Compact Committee.
Water Supply Planning
WSRA Program AdministrationUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Who else is involved in the program and what roles do they play?
The Basin Roundtables, Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) and Interbasin Compact Committee (IBCC) all participate in different ways. A summary of their primary responsibilities is provided below. 
 
Role of the Basin Roundtables (BRT): The term Basin Roundtable shall mean those roundtables established pursuant to Section 37-75-104 C.R.S.

  • Implement outreach and public education regarding the existence and use of the Account.
  • Approve water activities that are to be recommended to CWCB for funding. The approving BRT shall be the roundtable for the basin in which the proposed water diversion or nonstructural activity would occur.
  • Provide input and comment to the CWCB and IBCC for the annual review of these criteria and guidelines.
Role of the CWCB:

  • Jointly (with the IBCC) develop criteria and guidelines for allocating funds from the Account.
  • Annually review information regarding the Account.
  • In October of each year jointly (with the IBCC) consider and make any necessary revisions to these criteria and guidelines.
  • Implement outreach and public education regarding the existence and use of the Account. The CWCB in conjunction with the IBCC and BRTs will work to ensure a high level of awareness of the existence of the Account and the process to apply for funds. This effort will include but is not limited to: notice and discussion at roundtable meetings; inclusion of relevant information on the CWCB website; press releases; promotion at workshops; public meetings, and conferences.
  • Ensure that the Account is managed consistent with state statutes, applicable state fiscal rules, and the IBCC and CWCB jointly developed criteria and guidelines.
  • Review applications and allocate monies from the Account based on recommendations from the BRTs in accordance with the IBCC and CWCB jointly developed criteria and guidelines.
  • Enter into contracts with the selected entities and ensure that the water activity identified in the application and work plan is implemented within the time and budget identified in the application.
  • Ensure that sound fiscal, fiduciary and accounting practices are implemented. CWCB staff will handle the day-to-day administration of the Account. This effort includes but is not limited to: notification to successful and unsuccessful applicants; review of requests for payment, disbursement and tracking of payments, tracking project progress, ensure proper documentation of completed project/water activity; and preparation of an annual report of activities and expenditure from the Account.
Role of the Interbasin Compact Committee (IBCC):

  • Jointly (with the CWCB) develop criteria and guidelines for allocating funds from the Account.
  • Annually review information regarding the Account.
  • In October of each year jointly (with the CWCB) consider and make any necessary revisions to these criteria and guidelines.
  • Work with Basin Roundtables (BRT) to develop local roundtable criteria and guidelines for approving and recommending water activities that, following recommendations by the respective BRTs, will be eligible to seek funding from the Account.
  • Help ensure that data and information from the SWSI and other appropriate sources are used as the technical basis for requesting funding for a water activity.
Water Supply Planning
Receiving WSRA Funds - WhoUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Who can receive money?
The program has very few restrictions on who can receive money. The applicant must be willing to address any legal and income tax implications as well as being willing to enter into a contract with the State of Colorado. Eligible entities that may apply for grants or loans from the Account include:

  • Public (Government) - municipalities, enterprises, counties, state and federal government
  • Public (Districts) - special, water and sanitation, conservancy, conservations, irrigation, water activity enterprises
  • Private Incorporated - mutual ditch companies, homeowners associations, non-profit corporations
  • Private (Unincorporated) - individuals, partnerships, sole proprietors
  • Non-governmental organizations - are broadly defined as any organization that is not part of the government. These organizations are typically non-profit but they also include for-profit corporations.
Water Supply Planning
Restrictions on WSRA FundsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Are there other restrictions that I should be aware of?
Some entities (state and local governments) are subject to the “Tax Payer’s Bill of Rights” which is also known as Tabor. This law was enacted in 1992 and it limits both the debt AND revenue that a state or local government can incur or receive. Water conservation and conservancy districts, special districts, municipal and county governments are all likely to be subject to Tabor. Irrigation districts that primarily serve the private interests of its member may not be subject to Tabor. However, since Tabor is a complicated law and each entity is unique, it is the responsibility of the individual entity to ensure that they are in compliance with Tabor. There are many complexities and questions to comply with Tabor and it is advised that you work with your attorney and accountants to address Tabor.
Water Supply Planning
Receiving WSRA Funds - HowUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How do I receive money?
The program is operated to ensure full disclosure and documentation of the use of the funds. The means you must have a detailed cost estimate and scope of work. The cost estimate must include were applicable: unit costs, types and quantities of materials, labor rates and man hours, details on any direct or indirect costs, source and documentation of any matching or in-kind contribution (if provided not required). Once the application is approved by both the Basin Roundtable and Colorado Water Conservation Board the applicant will enter into a contract or purchase order with the State.
 
Monies will only be disbursed based on actual costs and detailed invoicing to the Colorado Water Conservation Board as described in the Criteria and Guidelines. Monies can not be forward funded and you can not be reimbursed for costs that you may have incurred prior to entering into a valid contract or purchase order
Water Supply Planning
Water Efficiency Grant ApplicationUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Is there a grant application form that needs to be filled out?
No, there is no application form for any of the grant programs. An applicant should submit a cover letter and scope of work with a project budget and schedule to the OWCDP for consideration. Close adherence to the Grant Guidelines is expected.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Matching Funds Requirement for Water Efficiency GrantsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Is there a matching contribution requirement for grant applications?
Yes, the Water Efficiency Grant Program requires that entities and agencies requesting funding under these programs will need to have and demonstrate the ability to provide 25% of the project budget with matching funds, either as cash or in-kind services or through payment of consulting fees or any combination thereof.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Board Meeting Attendance for Board Approval for Water Efficiency GrantsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
If my grant request requires Board approval, do I need to attend the Board meeting?
No, attendance is not mandatory. However, in many instances it is recommended that the grant applicant be present when the CWCB staff presents the grant request to respond to questions from the CWCB Board.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Timeline for Expending Water Efficiency Grant FundsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
If a grant is awarded, how much time do I have to expend the money and complete the project?
For the Water Efficiency Grant Program, grant monies must be expended and the project completed by the end date stated in the approved Scope of Work. The CWCB will withhold the final 10% of the grant award until the OWCDP approves a water conservation or drought mitigation plan or a project’s final report.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Efficiency Grants Maximum Grant AmountUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Is there a maximum grant amount?
There are no minimum or maximum amounts that entities or agencies can request, noting that:The CWCB cannot award more money than it has funds for in any given year.The entity is responsible for a 25% match of the project budget.Awards over $50,000 will be made by the Board
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Disbursing Water Efficiency Grants MoniesUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How are grant monies disbursed to the grant recipient?
The CWCB will make payments during the term of the project to the entity or agency that has been awarded funds, as requested by each applicant in its application. The individual payments do not need to be equal. All payments will be based on invoices for work already completed. For Water Conservation and Drought Mitigation Planning Grants, the final payment will be at least 10% of the total grant award, which will not be released until completion and OWCDP approval of a final water conservation or drought mitigation plan. For Water Conservation Implementation Grants and Water Education & Outreach Grants, the final payment will be at least 10% of the total grant award, which will not be released until completion of the project.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Reporting Requirements for Awared Water Efficiency GrantsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Are there any reporting requirements for grant funded projects?
Yes, all grant funded projects are required to provide written progress reports to the CWCB, via the OWCDP staff, at 50%, 75% completion of the project as well as a final report. The estimated dates of the progress reports must be included in the project scope of work contained in the application.  An approved Water Conservation or Drought Mitigation Plan is considered to be the final report.  In addition, Water Conservation Implementation Projects and Water Education & Outreach Project grant recipients will need to prepare and submit a final project report to the CWCB including a review of the activities completed, an estimate of actual water savings realized (for covered entities), and other information that is relevant to the CWCB’s record of the project and future use of the project outcomes.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Efficiency Grants Application Process TimelineUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How long does the grant application process take?
Currently, the grant application process may take between 6 – 8 weeks for OWCDP staff evaluation. This includes the time necessary to communicate with the applicant, sometimes repeatedly, on the need for additional information or clarification of the existing information.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Covered Entity DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is a covered entity?
A covered entity is defined in §37-60-126 C.R.S. as a municipality, agency, utility, including any privately owned utility, or other publicly owned with a legal obligation to supply, distribute, or otherwise provide water at retail to domestic, commercial, industrial, or public facility customers, and that has a total demand for such customers of 2000 acre-feet or more.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Agency DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is an agency?
An agency is defined in §37-60-126 C.R.S. as a public or private agency whose primary purpose is the promotion of water resource conservation.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Efficiency Grant Eligibility when not a Covered EntityUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
I am a water provider that is close to becoming a statutorily defined covered entity. Am I eligible for a water conservation planning grant even though I am not yet a covered entity?
Yes, an entity that is soon to become a covered entity may be eligible for a water conservation planning grant. The entity must disclose it organization structure, its charter, and its annual retail water demand for the past five years. A reasonable engineering estimate of future annual retail demand for the next three to five years based.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Project Loan Program Application ProcessUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How long does the process take?
A typical loan of less than $10 million can be processed in four months from submittal of the application and the loan feasibility study to the day funds are available.
Finance
Water Project Loan Program Funding in Shorter Time than Application TimelineUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What if I need funds sooner?
We recommend that the Borrower obtain a bridge loan from a local bank. The bridge loan can be paid in full (including fees and interest) with CWCB loan funds when they become available. The Borrower accepts the risks associated with the possibility that the CWCB may not approve project funding.
Finance
Minimum Loan Amount for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is the minimum loan amount?
A typical loan will require a borrower to spend money for services to obtain loan approval. These costs include engineering assistance for the preparation of a Loan Feasibility Study, as well as attorney fees associated with the review of the loan contract and a 1% loan origination fee. In addition a borrower must provide $1 million of liability insurance during the life of the loan. When considering these costs, a minimum loan amount of no less than $75,000 is recommended. Please contact the CWCB staff to assist you in making sure the Loan Program funding is right for your project.
Finance
Board Meeting Attendance for Board Approval of Water Project LoansUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Am I required to attend the Board Meeting to present the loan?
Attendance is not mandatory, however in many instances it is recommended that the Borrower be present when the CWCB staff presents the loan to respond to questions of the CWCB Board. The CWCB staff will let you know if you have to attend.
Finance
Parity Requirment for Water Project LoansUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
The CWCB may require a "parity certificate" before it will sign the loan contract. What is "parity" and how do I comply with this requirement?
If your organization has existing debt when the Board approves your loan, we will require you to submit a "parity certificate" prior to executing a loan contract. In financing situations, "parity" between two loans means that in the event of the borrower's default, the two lenders would divide the available assets on a pro-rata basis. In other words, neither lender would have a "first position" to attach the available assets of the default party without regard to the other lender. Accordingly, to secure a pro-rata share of a defaulting borrower's assets, the CWCB requires that you meet the parity requirements of your existing debt so that the CWCB will be on par with your existing loans. If we require a "parity certificate" from you, you must certify, through an independent certified public accountant, that you meet the parity tests contained in your existing loan agreements. Please see CWCB Financial Policy No. 6 for more information.
Finance
Additional Debt Superior to the CWCB Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
My CWCB loan contract contains a provision that prohibits additional debt or bonds that are superior to the CWCB loan. How do I comply with this requirement, also known as a "parity" requirement, if I desire to incur more debt?

If your contract contains a provision that prohibits you from obtaining new loans that are superior to the CWCB loan, you will need the consent of the CWCB before you can incur such debt. ("Superior" debt means that in the event of your default, the superior debt would have first access to your assets, and the CWCB would only get what was left, if anything, and that may be far less than what is owed.)

To request the consent of the CWCB, you will need to certify that the new debt meets the parity requirements contained in the loan contract and/or CWCB Financial Policy No. 6. Each request will be reviewed and evaluated by the CWCB staff on a case-by-case basis and will be approved or denied at the discretion of the CWCB Director.

Finance
Insurance Requirements for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
If I get a loan from the CWCB, what types of insurance will I be required to carry?

The State of Colorado requires all borrowers to have two types of insurance:

  1. Liability Insurance (Duration of Loan) The borrower must maintain commercial general liability insurance, with a company that is satisfactory to the CWCB, with minimum limits of $1,000,000 combined single limit for each occurrence and $2,000,000 general aggregate, including products/completed operations and personal injury.

    [Note: Governmental entities must comply with the minimum insurance requirements of the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act, 24-10-101 C.R.S., et seq., as amended, and provide proof of such insurance.]
  2. Liability Insurance (During Construction) During construction of the project, the borrower must require the construction firm(s) and any subcontractors to maintain the following insurance coverage during the term of their contracts for the construction of the project. No payments can be made to the borrower unless all insurance certificates are current.
    • Builder's risk insurance for construction in progress for all perils of loss including fire, wind, hail, and vandalism in an amount equal to the completed value of the project. Worker's compensation and employer's liability insurance in the required statutory amounts.
    • Automobile liability insurance that includes coverage for all owned, non-owned and hired vehicles with minimum limits of $1,000,000 combined single limit for bodily injury and property damage.
    • Commercial general liability insurance with minimum limits of $1,000,000 combined single limit for each occurrence and $2,000,000 general aggregate. This insurance coverage shall include products/completed operations and bodily injury/property damage.
Finance
Construction Inspection for Projects Funded by the Water Project Loan ProgramUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Does the CWCB provide construction inspection?
No. The CWCB's Design & Construction Manager will make frequent site visits during construction. The primary intent of the site visit is to verify that construction related to loan disbursements has occurred, and that such construction and related expenses are within the scope of work. The CWCB is available to assist with issues regarding design, bidding and construction issues but does not perform official inspection of the project.
Finance
In-kind Services for Phases of Projects Funded by the Water Project Loan ProgramUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Can the Borrower utilize in-kind services for phases of the Project?
Yes. All in-kind services must be documented and submitted to the CWCB, along with standard invoices. Contact the Design & Construction Manager for specific details.
Finance
Disbursement of Funds for Approved Water Project LoansUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How do I request money from our approved loan?
Money is requested by means of a payment request. A payment request consists of a cover letter, signed by the company president or other approved representative, with all supporting expense information attached (i.e. invoices, contractor monthly pay statement, etc.). Allow 7-10 business days for your request to be processed and the money to reach your account.
Finance
Completion of a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What do I do when I complete the project?
When you complete your project, you will need to inform the CWCB that the project has been completed. The CWCB will prepare a "substantial completion letter" and determine the amount of construction interest due (Interest During Construction - IDC), and the amount and date of the first annual payment. IDC is due 10 days after the date of substantial completion.The first annual payment is due one year after the date of substantial completion. Attached to the substantial completion letter will be a copy of the IDC calculation, amortization schedule, and a copy of the promissory note.
Finance
Professional Engineer Requirement for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Do I need a Professional Engineer on-site during project construction?
Each project will be evaluated to determine if the complexity of the project will require a professional engineer’s presence on site. In addition, the type of construction and the level of difficulty will also determine the amount of time that an engineer should be present. Contact the CWCB for additional assistance.
Finance
Bidding Process for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Do I have to advertise for bids?
The CWCB does require that a project be advertised for bids. However, if your project is located in an area with limited number of qualified contractors, you may be allowed to solicit bids from just those contractors in your area. Coordinate with your CWCB Design & Construction Manager.
Finance
CWCB Approval of Design and Construction Documents for Water Project LoansUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Does the CWCB have to approve the design plans and construction documents?
No. The CWCB does not formally approve the design plans for construction. The design engineer (registered professional engineer in Colorado) retained by the owner will approve the plans and construction documents. However, prior to the bid process, the CWCB will request a set of plans and specifications for review to ensure compliance with the loan program. If the project involves a jurisdictional dam, the State Engineer's Office must review and approve the design plans.
Finance
Pre-payment Penalty for Paying of a Water Project Loan EarlyUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Is there a financial penalty for paying off the loan early?
No. The borrower can make additional payments without penalty, which may reduce the term of the loan; however, the annual loan payment will remain the same and be due by the date established. If the Borrower desires to reduce the annual payment amount after a principal prepayment, a contract amendment will be required. The cost of a contract amendment is $1,000 as established in CWCB Financial Policy No. 16.
Finance
Loan Payment Change - Not all of the Money is Needed for the Water Project Loan Use SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
I did not need all of the loan money. Will my payments change?
You have the following two options:
  1. You may keep the annual payment the same and reduce the number of payments to pay off the adjusted loan balance; or
  2. You can request that the loan be re-amortized and the amount of the payment reduced leaving the term of the loan the same. An amendment to the contract is required for a change in the annual payment amount.
Finance
Options for Submitting Payment for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
My payment amount is too large to rely on mail service. What can I do?
Wire transfers directly from your bank can be made to safeguard your funds. Prior to the date that your payment is due, you will receive a reminder and instructions to make an Automated Clearing House (ACH) transfer, also known as an electronic fund transfer (EFT). Simply notify your bank with the CWCB account information, the amount of the payment, and the date of transfer. The CWCB will be notified upon receipt of the funds and you will be notified with the loan distribution including your balance to date. It is a good idea to call or email the CWCB with your anticipated wire in order to track the transfer.
Finance
Loan Repayment Process for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
How will I know when to make my payments and what my loan balance is?
When the project is completed and the annual payment date established, the promissory note to the contract will be filled in with the date of your first payment and a copy sent to you. In the month prior to the payment due date, a reminder will be sent notifying you of the amount and date due. Upon receipt of your payment, a letter containing the principal and interest distribution along with the loan balance will be sent to you. Should you not receive a reminder, it is still your responsibility to make your annual payment in a timely manner.
Finance
Insurance Requirement During Loan Repayment for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Do I need to maintain insurance coverage during my loan repayment?
Yes. The contract establishes the rates that coverage is needed and a proof of insurance will be sent to the CWCB each year upon renewal. This continues for the full term of the loan.
Finance
Collateral Requirement for a Water Project LoanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
The CWCB requires collateral to secure repayment of a loan. What type of collateral will the CWCB require?
State law requires the CWCB to obtain sufficient collateral from the borrower to assure repayment of the loan. The specific collateral the CWCB requires to secure a loan varies by project. Types of collateral include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) a pledge of assessment revenues backed by a rate covenant that guarantees that your organization’s assessment rates will be adequate to cover all of your debt obligations; (2) a pledge of your facilities, water rights, or other real property; and (3) other assets held by your organization. Finally, collateral requirements will be related to your creditworthiness and repayment capacity. The Board will determine the adequacy of collateral for each individual funding request. Please see CWCB Financial Policy No. 5 for more information regarding collateral.
Finance
Non-Reimbursable Project Investment QualificationsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Does my project qualify for a Non-Reimbursable Project Investment (Grant)?
You are encouraged to contact the CWCB to determine if the Grant request will fit the intent of the program.
Finance
Non-Reimbursable Project Investment Grants Application ProcessUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
What is the application deadline for a Non-Reimbursable Project Investment (Grant)?
The Construction Fund Grant deadline is August 1 of each year. The Severance Tax Trust Fund Operational Account Grant deadline is January 31 of each year.
Finance
Non-Reimbursable Project Investment Grant Funds DistributionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
When are approved funds available?
Grants are approved by the Legislature and signed by the Governor. When this has occurred a contract must be in place and all contract provisions met prior to the distribution of funds.
Finance
Beginning a Project before Approval of a Non-Reimbursable Project Investment GrantsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Can I start my project prior to Non-Reimbursable Project Investment (Grant) approval?
All work related to the approved project that will be submitted for CWCB funding must not start prior to final approval of the Grant contract.
Finance
Matching Funds Requirement for Non-Reimbursable Project Investment GrantsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Loans & Grants
Does the CWCB Non-Reimbursable Project Investment (Grant) require matching funds?
In general matching funds will increase the likelihood of the Grant approval for those programs that do not require matching funds; however, it is recommended that you contact the CWCB to determine if the request is in one of the matching fund programs.
Finance
Board Member AppointmentUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
How are Board members appointed?
The Governor appoints 8 of the Board members from each of the state's 8 major river basins, and 1 Board member from the City and County of Denver. These 9 appointed Board members are subject to Senate confirmation. The 10th voting Board member is the Executive Director of the Department of Natural Resources.
Administration & Management
Board Meeting FrequencyUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
How often and where are board meetings held?
They are held every two months in various locations throughout the state that are selected by the CWCB Board members.
Administration & Management
Board Member TermsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
How long are the terms of office for Board Members?
Three years.
Administration & Management
Political Make-up of BoardUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
Is the Board bi-partisan? If so, how many from each party?
Yes, the Board is bi-partisan, however, no more than 5 appointees can be from the same political party.
Administration & Management
Maps from the CDSSUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
I'd like a map of my local area. Who do I contact to make one for me?
You can make your own maps and print them using the DSS Map Viewer. This website allows you to choose the data you want to show on your map, add titles, and print it.
Water Information
Water Availability Task Force MeetingsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
How often does the Water Availability Task Force meet?
The Water Availability Task Force (WATF) meets, at a minimum, quarterly throughout the water year (October - September). However, during the months of March - August, the WATF may meet monthly to address and monitor rapidly changing water availability conditions around Colorado. Should drought conditions develop, the WATF will meet more often to monitor and plan for a drought response and needed mitigation activities.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Availability Task Force Meetings Schedule and AttendanceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
Are the Water Availability Task Force meetings open to the public and can I be notified of the meeting schedule?
Yes, meetings are open to the public and the public is encouraged to attend. To be notified, via email, of the upcoming meeting schedule, please see the CWCB/IBCC Insider page to add your name to our email distribution list.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Public Water Conservation Conferences and WorkshopsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Public Information
Does the OWCDP conduct workshops or conferences on water conservation for the public?
Yes, the OWCDP periodically, throughout the year may conduct workshops to assist water providers in water conservation planning and implementation projects. Currently, the OWCDP has partnered with a group of agencies, whose primary purpose is the promotion of water resource conservation, to conduct a series of regional water conservation workshops around the State.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
GIS Data AvailabilityUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Technical Resources
Where can I get GIS data?
GIS data can be downloaded from the Colorado's Decision Support Systems' Website. Data is available by State Engineer water division. All point layers and Instream Flow reaches are also available in the statewide download.
Water Information
Floodplain MapsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Where can I get a floodplain map?
The FEMA map service center website has all the current regulatory floodplain maps visit FEMA.gov and click on the map service center link. Then enter your full street address and the floodplain map should come up. Click view (green circle) to view the map.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Base Flood ElevationUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is a Base Flood Elevation (BFE)?
A Base Flood Elevation (BFE) is the height of the base flood, usually in feet, in relation to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929, the North American Vertical Datum of 1988, or other datum referenced in the Flood Insurance Study report, or average depth of the base flood, usually in feet, above the ground surface.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Flood Insurance Rate MapsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is a Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM)?
A Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) is an insurance and floodplain management map issued by FEMA that identifies areas of 1-percent annual chance flood hazard in a community. In some areas, the map also shows Base Flood Elevations and 0.2-percent annual chance floodplain boundaries and, occasionally, regulatory floodway boundaries.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Flood Insurance Policy RatesUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
How are the rates determined for a flood insurance policy?
A number of factors are considered in determining the premium for flood insurance coverage. They include the amount of coverage purchased; location; age of the building; building occupancy; design of the building; and, for buildings in Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs), elevation of the building in relation to the Base Flood Elevation. Buildings eligible for special low-cost coverage at a pre-determined, reduced premium rate are single-family and one- to four-family dwellings located in Zones B, C, and X. For these exceptions, certain loss limitations exist.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Flood Insurance RequiredUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
When is it mandatory to carry flood insurance?
The Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 and the National Flood Insurance Reform Act of 1994 mandate the purchase of flood insurance as a condition of Federal or federally regulated financing for acquisition and/or construction of buildings in Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) of any participating community. The purchase of flood insurance on a voluntary basis is frequently prudent, even outside of SFHAs. These Acts prohibit Federal agency lenders, such as the Small Business Administration (SBA) and United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Rural Housing Service, and Government-Sponsored Enterprises for Housing (such as Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae) from making, guaranteeing, or purchasing a loan secured by real estate or mobile home(s) in a SFHA, unless flood insurance has been purchased and is maintained during the term of the loan.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Need for Flood InsuranceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
I have lived here forever and have never been flooded. Why do I need flood insurance?
The flood hazards shown on National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) maps are based on the best information available at the time the maps were prepared. In many areas, hydraulic and hydrologic studies were conducted to reflect the long-term projection of flood risk. Because of the infrequent occurrence of flood events and the relatively short history of the NFIP, Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) are not based only on past flooding occurrences. The fact that a flood hasn't occurred within memory doesn't mean one won't happen soon. The 100-year flood is a relatively rare event (1-percent chance in any given year), but structures located in the floodplain have a significant chance (26%) of suffering flood damage during the term of a 30-year mortgage. For these reasons, flood insurance is required as a condition of receiving Federal or federally backed financing.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Located in a Floodplain ChallengedUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
If I disagree with my lender's determination that I am in a floodplain, what can I do?
In some cases, a lender determines that a property is in the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA), but the property owner disagrees. The SFHA is also known as the 100-year floodplain. Property owners in this situation have a couple of options. They may apply for a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA), or a Letter of Map Revision - based on Fill (LOMR-F) (if fill placement is the basis of the request). In addition, property owners may apply for a Letter of Determination Review (LODR). Forms for these purposes can be found on FEMA's website.
Watershed & Flood Protection
Colorado in a DroughtUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Is Colorado currently in a drought?
 This is an all too common question in Colorado and there is no straightforward answer. Drought is a prevalent natural phenomenon in Colorado. Single season droughts over some portion of the State are common. Prolonged periods of drought develop slowly over several years and are cyclical in nature. With Colorado’s semiarid and variable climate, there will always be a concern for water availability within the State.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Annual Rainfall for ColoradoUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
How much rainfall does Colorado receive annually?
Annual precipitation in Colorado averages only 17 inches statewide, with the majority of the State receiving only 12 – 16 inches.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Drought Mitigation Plan RequirementUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Am I required to have a state-approved Drought Mitigation Plan?
No, currently there is no statutory requirement that any entity have a State-approved Drought Mitigation Plan. However, the CWCB strongly recommends that water providers and state and local governmental entities develop a plan. Drought mitigation planning is critical to preserving essential public services and minimizing the adverse effects of a water supply emergency on public heath and safety, economic activity, environmental resources and individual lifestyles.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Drought Mitigation Plan vs. Water Conservation PlanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is the difference between Drought Mitigation Planning and Water Conservation Planning?
It is common to confuse drought mitigation planning and water conservation planning.
  • The goal of drought mitigation planning is to ensure an uninterrupted supply of water in an amount sufficient to satisfy essential needs. Drought response measures can include mandatory restrictions on certain water uses, water allocation or the temporary use of an alternative water supply. These measures are intended to be temporary responses to water supply shortages.
  • The goal of water conservation planning is to achieve lasting, long-term improvements in water use efficiency. Water conservation measures can include managing landscape irrigation, implementing conservation water rate structures, replacing or retrofitting water fixtures and similar efforts.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Drought Triggers DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What are drought triggers?
A drought trigger is the specific value of a drought indicator that activates a management response. For example, a drought trigger could be a reservoir decreasing below 50% of its storage capacity. In a drought contingency plan, trigger levels can be varied to alter the sensitivity of the response and the effectiveness of the plan. Defining drought triggers can be difficult. Trigger levels change over time, that is, an appropriate trigger level for a particular system may change dramatically if that system has an increase in available infrastructure or if water demands change dramatically. Urban water triggers are often quite different from agriculture drought triggers, as the urban infrastructure can often mitigate the impacts of short-term droughts.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Colorado Statewide Drought PlanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Does Colorado have a statewide drought plan?
Yes, the State currently follows the Colorado Drought Mitigation and Response Plan, which was updated in 2007. The Plan provides an effective and systematic means for the State to reduce the impacts of water shortages over the short or long term. The plan outlines a mechanism for coordinated drought monitoring, impact assessment, response to emergency drought problems, and mitigation of long term drought impacts.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Monitoring for DroughtUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What factors and indices are monitored for possible drought conditions?
Drought indicators are any single observation or combinations of observations that contribute to identifying the onset and/or continuation of a drought. Drought indicators can include measures of streamflow, precipitation, reservoir storage, the Palmer Drought Severity Index, which is a function of precipitation, temperature, and the available water content of the soil, and other similar measures. The effectiveness of drought indicators depends on the region and the resources. Often, the degree of infrastructure development in a region may define the most appropriate indicators.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Information and Resources for Developing a Water Conservation PlanUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Does the OWDCP have information or resources to help me in developing a meaningful water conservation plan?
Yes, the OWCDP offers both technical and financial assistance for entities seeking to plan for and implement meaningful water conservation. The OWCDP administers the Water Conservation Planning Grant program, which provides monies to eligible entities for water conservation planning. The OWCDP has also developed a comprehensive planning tool to help.  The Water Conservation Plan Development Guidance Document is filled with planning information, worksheets, and resources to support entities striving to create a complete water conservation plan.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Conservation DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is water conservation?
Water conservation is any beneficial reduction in water loss, waste, or use. It is the reduction in water use accomplished by implementation of water conservation or water efficiency measures. It is improved water management practices that reduce or enhance the beneficial use of water.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Efficiency DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is water efficiency?
The terms water efficiency and water conservation are often used interchangeably. Water efficiency is the accomplishment of a function, task, process, or result with the minimal amount of water feasible. (e.g. toilet flushing or showering)
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Conservation Incentive DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is a water conservation incentive?
A water conservation incentive is a policy or regulation, rate strategy, or public education campaign designed to promote customer awareness about the value of reducing water use and to motivate consumers to adopt specific water conservation measures.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
State-approved Water Conservation Plan RequirementsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Who is required to have a State-approved water conservation plan?
According to §37-60-126 C.R.S., all covered entities in Colorado shall develop, adopt, make publicly available, and implement a water conservation plan. Plans must comply, at a minimum, with the newly amended requisite plan elements identified in §37-60-126 C.R.S. Additionally, on and after July 1, 2006, a covered entity that seeks financial assistance from either the CWCB or the Colorado Water Resources and Power Development Authority shall submit to the CWCB a new or revised plan to meet water conservation goals adopted by the covered entity, in accordance with §37-60-126 C.R.S., for the CWCB’s approval prior to the release of new loan proceeds.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Water Conservation Plan ImportanceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Why is it important to develop a water conservation plan?
Water conservation is a key element of overall water resource planning. Long-term water conservation planning is needed to extend Colorado’s water supply as demands on it increase from a growing population. By setting goals to promote and ensure water use efficiency, wise water use, water transmission and distribution system efficiency, and supply substitution, water suppliers can increase long-term productive use of their water supply in order to satisfy customer needs without compromising desired water services.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Locally Adopted Water Conservation Plan DefinitionUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is a locally adopted water conservation plan?
A locally adopted Water Conservation Plan is a water conservation plan that has been adopted by a local municipality, water utility, special district, or similar that adheres to the requirement of §37-60-126 C.R.S. as amended by the Water Conservation Act of 2004.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Drought FrequencyUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
How often does drought occur?
Historical analysis of precipitation and other drought indices show that drought is a frequent occurrence in Colorado. Short duration drought as defined by the three-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) occur somewhere in Colorado in nearly nine out of every ten years. However, severe, widespread multiyear droughts are much less common. Since the 1893, Colorado has experienced six droughts that are widely considered “severe.” These droughts affected most of the state, involved record-breaking dry spells, and/or lasted for multiple years.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Monitoring Drought ConditionsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
Who monitors drought conditions?
The Water Availability Task Force monitors drought conditions at a statewide level. Local water providers also monitor drought conditions by using data provided by various agencies and also by monitoring conditions within their own watersheds.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning
Drought DeclarationUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
Water Management
What is a drought declaration?
Drought declarations are traditionally made by public officials and may be made at the local, state and federal level. In Colorado, the Water Availability Task Force is responsible for assessing drought conditions and recommends to the governor when an official drought declaration should be made. Water providers can also officially declare a drought. Water restrictions and other drought response measures may be enforced following local drought declarations.
Office of Water Conservation & Drought Planning